After Class Activities

Our program allows you plenty of time to discover your new country, culture, traditions and everyday life after your class is over.

Our students are accompanied by a school representative or teacher on many trips. This improves the relationship between teachers and pupils who become friends and thus creates a better atmosphere in the classroom and enables a greater understanding of the life of the country, its residents and culture.

Top Highlights: See What Frankfurt is Famous For

 

The Römer:

The Römer is one of Frankfurt’s most important landmarks. For over 600 years it has been used as the city’s town hall and houses various offices such as the registration office. It has been restored several times, the major reconstruction being the one after the war, but thankfully still retains the historical architectural touch. Traditional half-timbered houses in Romerberg Square look dramatic against the 21st-century skyline of the new Frankfurt, which now surrounds the Square. The Römer has full-length portraits of all 52 emperors of the Holy Roman Empire in a hall with a spectacular hand-carved wooden ceiling.

 

Financial District:

Frankfurt is important as a financial centre not only for Germany, but for the European Union. It's one of the largest Financial Districts in Europe. Internationally, it remains one of the world’s major financial centres along with New York, London and Tokyo.

Frankfurt’s skyline has some of the tallest buildings in Europe including the Commerzbank (the highest office building in Europe). Because they are concentrated in a small downtown area, Frankfurt is often nicknamed Mainhattan after New York City.

Frankfurt has a long history of commerce, mainly because if it’s central geographical location. Trading started at the Frankfurt Börse (Stock Exchange) in 1585, and has since only seen an unparalleled growth.

 

Sachsenhausen:

Sachsenhausen is situated in the city centre, on the South bank of the Main River, right opposite the Old Town. The main street of Sachsenhausen is very elegant and cosmopolitan with many charming cafes, wine bars, traditional cider houses, boutiques and a vibrancy found nowhere else in the city. The city’s largest flea market is spread along the banks of the river Main, offering the best bargains around.

Main Sights: Get to Know Frankfurt

 

Der Dom:

The Cathedral, a huge Gothic structure, rests on Carolingian foundation dating from 852 A.D., before which existed a Merovingian chapel built in 680. The present-day-church is the result of the expansion and reconstruction over the years as the original structure suffered damages from the fire of 1867, and later the Second World War. The latest restoration was in 1992 – 1994, when the nave was painted a bright red.

 

Die Paulskirche:

The Church of St. Paul, designed by architect Johann Friedrich Christian Hess, was the first meeting place of the delegates of Frankfurt National Assembly – Germany’s first freely elected parliament.

Like many other historical and architectural wonders, the Church of St. Paul also sustained heavy damage during the war. However, it was one of the first to be rebuilt. Since 1948, after the reconstruction, the Church has been used for exhibitions and events.

 

Der Eschenheimer Turm:

The Eschenheimer Turm is a 47 metre tower, and is one of the few remaining of about 60 towers which once encircled the city. The existing tower was built as a replacement for the first gate tower, and was completed in 1428. In 1806 – 1812, many of the older city walls were being demolished to be replaced by new ones, but this tower was one of the few spared.

It stands today in a busy plaza, with a subway station underneath. The ground floor is used as a bar and restaurant.

Palmengarten:

The Palmengarten is the larger of the two botanical gardens in Frankfurt. It is spread over 50 acres, and is well known not only for the wide variety of plant life it offers, but also for the concerts, festivals and exhibitions that are organised there.

At any time of the year the gardens are full of beautiful and interesting plants. Tropical plants such as orchids, palms, ferns and succulents grow in the greenhouses. The plants have been arranged in their own different biotopes such as the desert, rain forest, mangrove, etc.

 

Frankfurt Zoo:

The Frankfurt zoo is located near Sachsenhausen. It is the largest zoo in Germany and can easily be one of Europe’s best. It has over 3,200 animals of 600 species, and features an exotarium with polar, tropical, jungle, and sea environments. The African Veldt enclosure, not to be missed, houses numerous species of antelope and ostriches.

There is also a bear castle and a darkened exhibit where you can see nocturnal animals going about their nightly business. Children love the animal nursery, where they can watch zookeepers care for young creatures whose parents are unable to do so. The baby apes are especially worth a visit.

Excursions: Explore More of The Region

 

Heidelberg:

Heidelberg is situated about 80 km south of Frankfurt, along the Neckar River. It covers 14 districts, each with an attractive quality of its own. The picturesque beauty of this town has attracted the attention of many famous writers, painters and musicians.

The Old Town area has more than 10 museums, many private galleries and five playhouses. The Heidelberg Castle is one of the famous landmarks.  It also has many fascinating shops, pubs and restaurants.

The subtropical plants growing along the River are a major attraction for tourists. Equally intriguing is the Wieblingen district, where evidence of a mammoth and Stone Age civilization were found.

Wiesbaden:

Wiesbaden, Frankfurt and Mainz together constitute the Frankfurt Rhine Main Region. Wiesbaden is known as a spa town, because of the hot springs located there. Only 38 kilometres outside Frankfurt, Wiesbaden has many attractions. The Palace Square, in the centre of the city, is bordered by a number of exceptionally constructed buildings.

There are many parks, antique shops, and churches and cathedrals. Festivals and cultural events all year round, attractive leisure facilities and the scenic beauty of the Taunus hills and the River Rhine, with its vineyards and romantic castles, make the city a fascinating tourist centre.

 

Mainz:

Located on the River Rhine, across Wiesbaden, Mainz has an impressive history of over 2000 years. Today it is known for its wine trade, and is a member of the Great Wine Capitals Global Network. It is also known for the offices of Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen or the Second German Television, which is one of the two federal TV broadcasters.

At the western edge of the city, the Mainz Sand Dunes are a nature reserve that date back to the last ice age.

Architecture: Discover Unique Styles & Structures

 

Financial District:

Frankfurt is important as a financial centre not only for Germany, but for the European Union. It's one of the the largest Financial Districts on Continental Europe. Internationally, it remains one of the world’s major financial centres along with New York, London and Tokyo. It is located right in the centre of the Rhine-Main region, at the centre of Europe.

Frankfurt’s skyline has some of the tallest buildings in Europe including the Commerzbank (the highest office building in all of Europe). Because they are densely concentrated in the small downtown area, Frankfurt is often nicknamed Mainhattan in reference to New York City.

Frankfurt has a long history of commerce, mainly because if it’s central geographical location. Trading started at the Frankfurt Börse (Stock Exchange) in 1585, and has since only seen an unparalleled growth.

 

The Römer:

The Römer is one of Frankfurt’s most important landmarks. For over 600 years it has been used as the city’s town hall and houses various offices such as the registration office. It has been restored several times, the major reconstruction being the one after the war, but thankfully still retains the historical architectural touch.

The traditional half-timbered houses in the Romerberg Square look dramatic against the 21st-century skyline of the new Frankfurt, which now surrounds the Square. The Römer has full-length portraits of all 52 emperors of the Holy Roman Empire in a hall with a spectacular hand-carved wooden ceiling.

 

Sachsenhausen:

Sachsenhausen is situated in the city centre, on the South bank of the Main River, right opposite the Old Town. The main street of Sachsenhausen is very elegant and cosmopolitan with many charming cafes, wine bars, traditional cider houses, boutiques and a vibrancy found nowhere else in the city. The city’s largest flea market is spread along the banks of the river Main, offering the best bargains around.

 

Höchst:

Höchst is a popular destination in June and July because of the folklore festival held there. It also has Frankfurt’s best original beam and mortar structures because it is one of the few areas of Frankfurt that escaped bombing during World War II. You can still see original half-timbered buildings and cobblestone streets.

An example of the architecture of the Middle Ages is The Church of St Justin, which is the oldest building in Frankfurt. The Höchst Castle, built between the 13th through to the 16th centuries, has a fine collection of porcelain exhibits.

Museums: Experience The History of Past Generations & Cultures

 

Goethe's House:

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was born at Goethe’s House (Goethehaus) in the Old Town of Frankfurt am Main. At age sixteen he left for Leipzig to study law. From 1795 to 1863 the house passed through the hands of different owners, and in 1863 it was bought by Otto Volger who restructured the house to the same condition as the Goethe family had left it and opened it to the public. However, it was destroyed in on May 22, 1944 during WWII and restored to as near the original as possible after the War. Next door is the Goethe Museum.

 

The Jewish Museum:

Until the Holocaust, the Jewish community in Frankfurt was the second largest in Germany after Berlin. The Jewish Museum (Jüdisches Museum), which was opened in 1988 in Frankfurt, details the history of the Jewish community from the early Middle Ages to the present. It occupies the nineteenth century Rothschild residence and also the building next door and the exhibits are showcased over two floors.

 

The Museum for Applied Arts:

Built on the Museum Embankment in central Frankfurt, the Museum of Applied Arts (Museum fur Kunsthandwerk) was designed by American architect Richard Meier. It is an illustration of the integration of man-made construction with the preservation of nature. A monument to good taste, the Museum of Applied Arts contains beautifully crafted objects from all over the world.

 

The Städel Art Institute and Municipal Gallery:

The Städel Art Institute & Municipal gallery (Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie) has a great collection of art from the 14th century to the present. Spread over two floors, it is definitely one of the most important art galleries in Germany. The art collections are housed in two buildings – a historic nineteenth century building and a white cube shaped one built in 1990.

The art works include treasured works of Monet, Renoir, Reubens, Botticelli, Van Gogh, and many other artists.

 

Senckenberg Museum of Natural History:

One of the biggest natural history museums in Germany, the Senckenberg has a large collection of dinosaur skeletons, including an exhibit of preserved, scaled skin. The building was built during the years 1904 to 1907 near the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University.

The museum has exhibits of animals from every era in Earth’s history. It is an experience of the exuberant variations of life (biodiversity), the evolution on our planet and the planet over millions of years.

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